North Channel Island Hopping

Everything we were told about Canada’s North Channel is true… it’s magnificent! More like Colorado than ever, it has even bigger boulders and more pine trees on small foothills. But it is all surrounded by gorgeous emerald green water so clear you can easily see 15-20 feet down.

We focused on the islands in the north eastern part of the channel and anchored at a different island each day, every one unique and beautiful. We explored in our dinghy, swam and bathed off our swim platform, grilled and ate dinner on the back deck, then played cards or read after dinner. Not many people out here, it’s a perfect place to get away. So relaxing…ahhhh…

But the Benjamin Islands deserve a special shout out. Wow, this little group of islands was amazingly beautiful! Not sure we captured it well but let’s give it a shot…

Before entering the North Channel, we stayed at Killarney Mountain Lodge Marina for two days. I fell in love with its mountain decor, pristinely beautiful and expansive grounds, and refreshing pool. If you’d like a Canadian vacation not too far from the States but far away from it all, I’d highly recommend this place. Free kayaks and canoes, too!

Only bad thing about the North Channel is the poor internet connection. But then again, maybe that’s the point!

We headed toward home in FOG. It’s utterly nerve wracking floating through water blindly when visibility is only a half mile – good for the prayer life! But it doesn’t faze Captain Craig who is used to flying airplanes in clouds by instruments only. Ugh.

Yesterday we re-entered the good ol’ USA at Drummond Island, Michigan! We were in Canada for exactly one month and it was very lovely but it’s great to see the stars and stripes flying again, besides on the back of our boat. Today we are headed to the Les Cheneaux Islands in Northern Michigan to anchor out a few days before our stay at Mackinaw Island on July 18th.

And we are delighted to have very special guests visiting us in Petoskey, Michigan on July 23rd!  More on that later…

Gorgeous Georgian Bay

If you asked us to sum up our thoughts on the Georgian Bay we’d say this: it’s Rocky Mountain National Park on water. For the past week we’ve been reminded of our beautiful home state of Colorado as we cruise by huge lichen-covered boulders, miles of coniferous trees, the sweet smell of pine sap and deep blue skies. Just add water and you’ve got the Georgian Bay.

We spent the week anchoring in spots ranging from pristine, quiet getaways to bays filled to the brim with other boats. Everyone who owned a boat was out on Canada Day weekend and we watched a private fireworks show on an island right next to us (scared poor Scully nearly to death!). We spent July 4th at anchorage with our American friends, Tom and Julie.

Canada didn’t escape the early summer heat wave so when it got too hot to handle, we jumped off our boat and took a dip in the clean, refreshing water. That was a first for me and I loved it! Craig had a blast diving off various parts of the boat but hasn’t found the nerve to plunge in from the fly-bridge yet. Other days were cool and windy, requiring sweat shirts.

Christian Island was a very special, peaceful anchorage for us, made famous by Gordon Lightfoot’s song of the same name. His lyrics summarized Craig’s mood perfectly…

I’m sailing down the summer wind
I got whiskers on my chin
And I like the mood I’m in
As I while away the time of day
In the lee of Christian Island

We traveled through easy, broad bays then, just around the corner, channels so narrow that we held our breath as we squeaked through, boulders surrounding us on both sides and below us, their sharp edges visible through the clear water. Check out this video…

We are now in Killarney, Ontario at the base of the North Channel, an even more remote area. If you, like me, said, “Huh? Where is that?” see the photo below:

After about a week anchoring in the the North Channel we will be back in the States on Mackinaw Island on July 18th.  Hope everyone is well and happy!

Traveling The Trent-Severn

Without doubt, everyone was right – Canada is beautiful! We are one day away from exiting their lock system, the Trent-Severn Waterway, where many Canadians take their summer respite and enjoy the water. The Waterway shores are lined with summer cottages decked to the nines with water toys including slides, gazebos, water trampolines, and of course, boats. Some areas were frighteningly narrow and shallow and others spread out into ponds and lakes filled with tiny, rock islands with homes built on them. Imagine spending the summer on your own island!

We’ve been through 70 locks since we started the Erie Canal. We went up 418 feet then down 180 in the Erie. We went up 600 feet and came down 260 in the Trent. Your faithful First Mate grabbed lines, tied them down, hung on tight to keep Joy Girl steady, put fenders out, took fenders back in…70 times.

Due to sheer exhaustion, I earned a three day rest in the beautiful boutique town of Orillia, birthplace of Gordon Lightfoot and our favorite city on the waterway.

A few locks deserve special coverage, namely the Peterborough & Kirkfield Lift Locks and the Big Chute Marine Railway. Captain Craig will explain the technicalities of the lift locks for the guys…

Unlike conventional locks which open or close valves to fill or empty their chambers, the lift locks feature two matching pans holding between 1300 and 1500 tons of water each. Boats displace water equal to their weight (hence the term displacement) so their presence in the lock chambers has no effect on the weights. Once the boats are in and secured, the water level is increased by merely a foot or so in the upper chamber, and that is all it takes to aid the two sides in their opposing 65 foot vertical journeys. It’s incredible to think about, and even more so to behold and enjoy. And yes, enjoy is the correct word, because with their almost constant water levels, it is much easier on the crews who don’t have to attend the lines nearly as closely.

Big Chute was the only lock to pick Joy Girl up in a marine railway car, drive us over land, and plop us down 58 feet on the other side! It was like a slow motion boat roller coaster ride and a great way to end the Trent-Severn with a big bang (no, we didn’t fall out of the slings 🙂

After tomorrow it’s goodbye to the Trent Severn and hello to the Georgian Bay, the land of 30,000 islands and crystal clear water. Where the heck is that? We’ll be in the highlighted area of this map.

This is a place of unspoiled beauty and not many towns or marinas, so we’ll be anchoring out for about a week. We won’t have much of an internet connection, so we’ll reconnect on the other side. Ciao for now!

Canada, eh?

For the past two weeks we deliberated where to go next when we emerged from the Erie Canal at Oswego, NY. Our initial plan was to go west to Lake Erie, see family  and friends, then up through Detroit and on to Lake Michigan.

But then we heard from other boaters that the Trent-Severn Waterway and the Georgian Bay in Canada were renowned for their beauty and should not be missed. We were so torn…

After much thought (and sadness that we’ll miss family on Lake Erie), we decided to make a run to Canada. We hope my cousins and uncle will visit us again in other locations!

We are now in Trenton, Ontario after cruising 10 hours across Lake Ontario. Captain Craig chose a splendid day for the crossing and the lake was smooth as glass…no seasickness for Niki or the kitties 😀

After we cleared customs (just a quick phone call) we took down the yellow quarantine flag and raised the Canadian courtesy flag. Our big American flag still flies at the stern (back of the boat).

If you’ve never heard of the Trent-Severn before (join the club!), here is a Google map. It’s a continuous waterway that consists of lakes, rivers and 45 locks and connects Lake Ontario to the Georgian Bay and Lake Huron. (Didn’t think you’d be getting a geography lesson, did ya?)

After the Georgian Bay (rumored to be glorious) and the North Channel, we’ll skip over to Mackinac Island in northern Michigan. At that point we’ll be just a hop away from Craig’s home state of Wisconsin where we plan to hang out for a month or so.

We welcome visitors anywhere along this route. Come see us and take a cruise on Joy Girl!

We’ve Got It Locked Up

We received a few inquiries about how we are faring in the Erie Canal, so we apologize for the delay in this post. After a full day of locks we were just too tired to write!

Leaving Waterford, NY the first day, Captain Craig was nervous for Joy Girl as we heard horror stories of out-of-control boats ramming others, hull scratches from the lock walls, locks breaking, etc. But we’ve had great neighbor boats, the locks are not too turbulent so it’s fairly easy to keep Joy Girl steady, and things have run smoothly.

Here’s the drill: we drive through the narrow lock gate, secure Joy Girl by either grabbing a line that drops down from the top or wrap a line around a cable that extends the length of the wall, then hang on, keeping the boat near the wall. The lock then slowly fills with water. The tallest lock lifted us up 40 feet.

One afternoon – while Niki took a nap out of sheer exhaustion – Craig toured the hundred year old Lock #14 (the canal was begun in 1817). The very friendly and informative lock master named Chris took him on an extensive tour of the lock’s inner workings and mechanisms. While they were talking, a tug boat came into the lock and, under careful supervision, Craig was allowed to open the valves and run the lock. Many captains go through the locks but not many are privileged to operate them!

We have been through 23 locks so far…whew! Since First Mate Niki does most of the line handling, she is now pooped (although not too pooped to party!)

About the canal itself…it’s pretty, filled with Cottonwoods and deciduous trees. But if I am brutally honest, I was spoiled by the East Coast. After a day of travel, it was wonderful to visit world-class cities like Charleston, Annapolis and New York City. Upstate New York is a quieter, country atmosphere and, unfortunately, there is not a lot of money or industry here anymore and the towns are struggling.

We have nine more locks to go before we arrive in Oswego, NY, located on Lake Ontario and the end of the New York state canal system for us. For now, we are taking a much needed three day break in Brewerton, NY in a sweet marina called Ess-Kay Yards.

Tomorrow, we do not travel…ahhhhh!

The Hudson River Line

I’m taking a Greyhound on the Hudson River Line. I’m in a New York state of mindBilly Joel

As we traverse up the Hudson River we haven’t seen any buses but, to Craig’s joy, we have seen many Hudson Line trains, both passenger and cargo. River traffic is light with only a few enormous barges quietly sliding by. Old lighthouses pepper the landscape.

There is a deep peace that settles on the Hudson after the high paced energy of New York City. It doesn’t take long for the millions of people, the noise and the lights to fade away into stillness, mist and greenery.

Coolest thing for me, after singing Billy Joel songs all week – we met the couple who now lives on the Florida Bay Coaster that Billy Joel owned called “Red Head”.  Got to tour the boat, which was 1,400 square feet and built like iron box!  Billy used to have 2 Harley’s on it which could be lifted out with the crane at the front of the boat. No frills for Billy, just a tough, almost commercial level, motor vessel.

We are now in Waterford, NY, at the beginning of the Erie Canal. Successfully went through our first lock today but no photos since we were pretty nervous, will take some soon! Should take us a few days to get to Oswego, NY on Lake Ontario…

I Love New York!

I haven’t been to New York since my teenage years. I loved it then but I wondered if my taste or the city had changed after all those many (!) decades.

But, no. It’s still absolutely amazing and was worth every hour of that icky open ocean ride we had to endure to get here.

What a thrill to drive Joy Girl into New York Harbor! We expected hundreds of huge commercial ships to terrify us but, surprisingly, only a few large barges were anchored out and a few ferries and tour boats passed us. We motored past Lady Liberty, Manhattan, up the East River and under the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges, then into the Hudson. It was a glorious day for photos!

We docked Joy Girl at the 79th Street Boat Basin on the Hudson river. Right next to beautiful Riverside Drive and just west of Central Park, this marina was a fabulous location to launch into the city.

We pedaled, walked and metro’d through NYC for two days and crammed in as much city as possible. We saw the Broadway theaters, Times Square, 9/11 memorial, the financial district, Battery Park, the government district, Chinatown, Little Italy, SoHo, Grants Tomb, and the never ending stream of breathtaking residential architecture that graces the streets.

I loved it all. Craig isn’t a city guy so he wasn’t so thrilled, and we both agree NYC is not as bike friendly as we’d hoped. But I loved walking around, absorbing all I could. There is still so much more to see, but that just means we’ll have to go back to visit again!

And now we go up the Hudson River toward Albany, NY…

 

New York State Of Mind

Today we successfully made the ocean run from Atlantic City to New York…11 hours on swells, waves, and fog, traversing the Jersey Shore. We couldn’t travel through the New Jersey ICW (Intracoastal Waterway) because it hasn’t been maintained and it’s too shallow for Joy Girl. So, to the ocean we went…

We don’t like to be negative but we would never recommend Atlantic City to anyone…such a surreal place with unkempt casinos and scary slums just one street away from the boardwalk. We won’t return there.

Atlantic City

For tonight, we congratulated ourselves on a tough day at Cole’s Dockside Restaurant on Staten Island:

Tomorrow: New York City! I found out that New York is very bike friendly so we’ll be cycling through the Big Apple. Billy Joel is running through my mind…

Another bit a good news: I’ve trained the kitties to know that when we stop for the day, they get…TREATS! The minute we stopped the boat today, they ran downstairs (instead of being frozen in fear) to get their kibble. We were happy to see them so lively the minute we stopped for the day.

Happy weekend to you!

 

The Sailing Capital: Annapolis

Did you know Annapolis, Maryland, is considered the Sailing Capital of the World? We’ve never seen so many sailboats, thousands of them lined the channels! This is a typical marina – mostly sailboats and only a few power boats. Joy Girl was lonely for her kind.

Last week in Virginia we saw Jamestown (the first English settlement) and Yorktown (where the final battle for our independence was won). Our American history tour continued in Maryland, which was home to four signers of the Declaration of Independence, plus George Washington resigned his commander in chief commission in Annapolis after the war. This was very significant because it was thought he might retain his power and rule like a king but, instead, he laid his military authority down to Congress and the American people and therefore solidified the foundation of freedom for our new nation.

A beautiful metal sculpture stands where they believed he retired and returned to private life. They still have his handwritten speech…it was quite moving to see such humility in the man who was to become our first President.

It was Commissioning (graduation) weekend at the Naval Academy so white-uniformed midshipmen were everywhere and we were excited to see their beautiful chapel, visit the museum and eat lunch at the Academy Drydock restaurant.

Because it was commissioning weekend, the Blue Angels performed over Annapolis! Joy Girl, along with hundreds of other boats, anchored at the mouth of the Severn River to watch the show. Unfortunately, Niki’s tummy was extremely unhappy for several hours as we bobbed around like a cork while boats of every size and shape wrestled for a spot to anchor. But after everyone settled down, the water was fine and the Angels screamed overhead.

This port of call was made even better by a visit from my old friend, Maureen McAuliffe, who drove down from DC to see us. We had wonderful dinner on the waterfront.

This afternoon we plan to arrive in Cape May, New Jersey!

Naval Norfolk

Cruising up the Elizabeth River into Norfolk, Virginia our mouths dropped open as we gazed up in awe at the enormous Norfolk Naval Shipyard. One of the oldest and largest shipyards in the world, it specializes in repairing, overhauling and modernizing ships and subs. The Yard stretches on for miles and miles, one huge warship after another. Joy Girl felt like a pipsqueak beside them.

We had the privilege of boarding one of these military marvels as the USS Wisconsin has been retired, is open for tours, and was moored a short walk from our marina. This gigantic girl, nicknamed Wisky, is 887 feet long, 108 feet wide and was crewed by as many as 2,800 men. She had nine 16 inch guns that fired 2,700 pound shells. She fought in WW II, Korea and in Operation Desert Storm – an epic battleship.

Norfolk made us glad that these warships are on our side! Waterside Marina was smack dab in the midst of downtown, in the epicenter of everything, and surrounded by military might. It was quite the visit!